Andrew Dwyer 

Visiting Fellow

 

Career

Since 01/2019

Visiting Fellowship at Collaborative Research Centre (SFB) "Dynamics of security – Forms of securitisation in historical perspective" at the Universities Giessen and Marburg, Germany 

2016 – 2017

Committee member of the Digital Geographies Working Group at the UK Royal Geographical Society

Research Assistant, ‘Good Germs, Bad Germs’ project at the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford

 Since 10/2014

Doctoral Studies, Centre for Doctoral Training in Cybersecurity and the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford

2010 – 2013

Bachelor of Arts in Geography, Department of Geography, University of Durham

   

Research in brief

Thesis: Malware Ecologies: A Politics of Cybersecurity

Abstract: Malicious software, oft abbreviated to malware, is affecting society at greater depth and frequency through our growing (inter)dependency on computation. From attacks impacting the UK’s NHS, to threats of ‘cyberwar,’ to techniques to steal confidential documents to influence democratic elections, malware plays a major role in contemporary politics. Yet, there has been little critical attention to malware as an object, as a political actor that exceeds human intent. In this thesis, I explore malware and its politics, conducting an (auto)ethnographic study of a malware analysis laboratory in a process of 'becoming-analyst' at the UK ‘anti-virus’ business, Sophos. With the support of four case study forms (ConfickerStuxnetthe Dukes, and WannaCry/(Not)Petya), I ask how societies encounter and understand threats presented by malware in the twenty-first century. I argue we need a new way of thinking. This moves away from conventional pathological logics that conflate organic and non-organic systems, of malware as a defined object moving within networks, or as a kind of disease. Thinking ecologically draws on the experimentation of early thinking in ‘viral’ thought to conceive malware as political actors, exploring how analysts analyse, detect, and curate knowledge of malware, and how the performance of malware affect politics and international relations. I wish to demonstrate malware geographies extend far beyond the boundaries of what has previously been considered 'virtual' or 'cyber' space. This provides a platform to critique contemporary cybersecurity theorisation to consider whether conventional notions of space, and hence security, are suitable and in so doing, presenting malware ecologies as an alternative.

 

Publications

  • Lorimer, J., Hodgetts, T., Dwyer, A., Greenhough, B., McLeod, C., and Grenyer, R. (2019, forthcoming). Making the microbiome public: participatory experiments with DNA sequencing in domestic kitchens. Transactions of the British Institute of Geographers.
  • Dwyer, A. (2018). "The NHS cyber-attack: A look at the complex environmental conditions of WannaCry." RAD Magazine, 44, 512: 25-26.
  • Greenhough, B., Dwyer, A., Grenyer, R., Hodgetts, T., McLeod, C., Lorimer, J. (2018). "Unsettling antibiosis: How might interdisciplinary researchers generate a feeling for the microbiome and to what effect?” Palgrave Communications 4(1). https://doi.org/10.1057/s41599-018-0196-3 
  • Hodgetts, T., Grenyer, R., Greenhough, B., McLeod, C., Dwyer, A., Lorimer, J. (2018). "The microbiome and its publics: A participatory approach for engaging publics with the microbiome and its implications for health and hygiene." EMBO reports 19(6). DOI: 10.15252/embr.201845786.
  • Dwyer, A. (2015) "Future Fossils: The Pacemaker". Society and Space (Open Site). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20180510034505/http://societyandspace.org/2015/08/20/the-pacemakerandew-dwyer/ 

 

 


Andrew Dwyer

Andrew Dwyer 

Visiting Fellow

 

Career

Since 01/2019

Visiting Fellowship at Collaborative Research Centre (SFB) "Dynamics of security – Forms of securitisation in historical perspective" at the Universities Giessen and Marburg, Germany 

2016 – 2017

Committee member of the Digital Geographies Working Group at the UK Royal Geographical Society

Research Assistant, ‘Good Germs, Bad Germs’ project at the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford

 Since 10/2014

Doctoral Studies, Centre for Doctoral Training in Cybersecurity and the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford

2010 – 2013

Bachelor of Arts in Geography, Department of Geography, University of Durham

   

Research in brief

Thesis: Malware Ecologies: A Politics of Cybersecurity

Abstract: Malicious software, oft abbreviated to malware, is affecting society at greater depth and frequency through our growing (inter)dependency on computation. From attacks impacting the UK’s NHS, to threats of ‘cyberwar,’ to techniques to steal confidential documents to influence democratic elections, malware plays a major role in contemporary politics. Yet, there has been little critical attention to malware as an object, as a political actor that exceeds human intent. In this thesis, I explore malware and its politics, conducting an (auto)ethnographic study of a malware analysis laboratory in a process of 'becoming-analyst' at the UK ‘anti-virus’ business, Sophos. With the support of four case study forms (ConfickerStuxnetthe Dukes, and WannaCry/(Not)Petya), I ask how societies encounter and understand threats presented by malware in the twenty-first century. I argue we need a new way of thinking. This moves away from conventional pathological logics that conflate organic and non-organic systems, of malware as a defined object moving within networks, or as a kind of disease. Thinking ecologically draws on the experimentation of early thinking in ‘viral’ thought to conceive malware as political actors, exploring how analysts analyse, detect, and curate knowledge of malware, and how the performance of malware affect politics and international relations. I wish to demonstrate malware geographies extend far beyond the boundaries of what has previously been considered 'virtual' or 'cyber' space. This provides a platform to critique contemporary cybersecurity theorisation to consider whether conventional notions of space, and hence security, are suitable and in so doing, presenting malware ecologies as an alternative.

 

Publications

  • Lorimer, J., Hodgetts, T., Dwyer, A., Greenhough, B., McLeod, C., and Grenyer, R. (2019, forthcoming). Making the microbiome public: participatory experiments with DNA sequencing in domestic kitchens. Transactions of the British Institute of Geographers.
  • Dwyer, A. (2018). "The NHS cyber-attack: A look at the complex environmental conditions of WannaCry." RAD Magazine, 44, 512: 25-26.
  • Greenhough, B., Dwyer, A., Grenyer, R., Hodgetts, T., McLeod, C., Lorimer, J. (2018). "Unsettling antibiosis: How might interdisciplinary researchers generate a feeling for the microbiome and to what effect?” Palgrave Communications 4(1). https://doi.org/10.1057/s41599-018-0196-3 
  • Hodgetts, T., Grenyer, R., Greenhough, B., McLeod, C., Dwyer, A., Lorimer, J. (2018). "The microbiome and its publics: A participatory approach for engaging publics with the microbiome and its implications for health and hygiene." EMBO reports 19(6). DOI: 10.15252/embr.201845786.
  • Dwyer, A. (2015) "Future Fossils: The Pacemaker". Society and Space (Open Site). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20180510034505/http://societyandspace.org/2015/08/20/the-pacemakerandew-dwyer/ 

 

 


Andrew Dwyer